• Posted on 7/8/2021

    Select Medical, Physio's parent company, was proud to collaborate with the CDC on an important clinical study regarding the long-term impact of COVID-19. The study validates our Recovery and Reconditioning Program to focus on specific deficits in patients recovering from COVID-19 and other debilitating illnesses and conditions.

    Findings of the study indicate that patients recovering from COVID-19 could benefit from additional personalized rehabilitation services aimed at both physical and mental health. As the nation’s largest provider of outcomes-based, innovative physical therapy, Select Medical, along with Physio, is expertly positioned to guide the recovery of this 33.5 million patient population.

    The Recovery and Reconditioning program launched in June 2020 amid the pandemic and was developed in partnership with leading physicians, including physiatrists, pulmonologists, infectious disease specialists as well as physical and occupational therapists and speech-language pathologists. Following evidence-informed program guidelines, our licensed physical and occupational therapists tailor a plan of care to address patients’ specific needs and goals to resume pre-COVID activities and routine.

    Physio centers are “direct access” and do not require a physician referral to receive care. If you or a loved one are recovering from COVID-19, please click here to find a center near you and schedule an appointment today.

     


  • Posted on 6/28/2021

    Whether you’re new to the sport of triathlon or jumping back in after a longer break in racing, many are excited to drop any weight gained during the past year. It’s the perfect time of year to get outside and back to racing.

    While triathlons are a great way to push our bodies and are relatively safe for individuals at any age, athletic background or ability level, participants also need to be aware of the:

    • Pitfalls of overtraining
    • Importance of rest
    • Appropriate time to take some time off

    What defines rest and why is it important?

    Rest comes in many forms. It can be as simple as the time between repetitions, intervals or sets or a scheduled day off in your training plan. And, it can be skipping a workout when you are tired and feeling worn down, physically or mentally.

    If you sustain an injury or have an illness, rest may mean prolonged time away. However, rest doesn’t mean you have to completely stop all activity. You can take time off from typical training to work on mobility, participate in a yoga class, go for a walk, spend extra time on nutrition or enjoy a hot bath and relax.

    Whether planned or forced, rest allows the body to adapt to the stressors and changes in demand being placed on it. It allows muscles to recover and gain strength, our nervous system to adapt to changes and regenerate and our body to replenish our energy stores. Rest ultimately decreases the risk of overtraining, overtraining syndrome and overuse injuries.

    Triathlon training naturally allows our muscle groups to get some rest. When training in one discipline, the muscles involved in the other disciplines naturally get some time off. Spending the day in the pool gives your body a break from the repetitive pounding on the pavement from running, and with cycling or spinning, your shoulders get some needed time off from the resistance of the water.

    When is it time to take off, skip a workout and push training to another day?

    What are the signs of needing a break?

    As you dive into your training plan and are weeks out from the year’s first event, here are some important signs and symptoms that your body is telling you to take a break:

    • You are suffering through workouts that were previously done with ease
    • Notice your form is deteriorating or you are slower in any of your disciplines
    • It is harder to wake up
    • Increased irritability
    • Decreased motivation to train or in your daily life
    • Decreased concentration during work-outs
    • Increased sleeping
    • More frequent soreness or injuries (and it’s not due to an increase in intensity level of working out)
    • Increased illness

    If we don’t listen to these signs, our bodies may just force us to rest. If this happens, we can end up overtraining or sidelined with an injury.

    What is overtraining?

    Overtraining, simply put, is doing more than your body can handle at any given time. There is an imbalance between training, nutrition and rest leading to a decrease in performance, increase in fatigue and a decline in mood. For a well-trained athlete, overtraining may occur when putting in extra training sessions on an already full schedule. If you’re a rookie, it might mean jumping in too quickly with one or two extra days of training.

    Overtraining can be influenced by outside workload when we are stretching our personal schedules and sleep routines too thin. You may see you are underperforming with little to no change in your training program. Or, you may find you have more difficulty sleeping - falling asleep or staying asleep despite fatigue from working out.

    Once this stage or overtraining is reached, athletes will often find an elevated heart rate, especially first thing in the morning as well as deficiencies in vitamins B12 or D, lower iron levels and increase in creatine kinase levels in the blood. All of these can be serious signs of overtraining syndrome and can force an athlete into three-to-eight weeks off from training and treatment by a medical professional.

    What are overuse injuries?

    The most common overuse injuries in triathletes and athletes in general are from overtraining or overuse. Overuse injuries represent the largest percentage of sports-related injuries that require medical attention and are most common in runners and endurance athletes (triathletes).

    Approximately 50-70% of triathlete injuries occur when running, and the majority of those are overuse. These injuries most often occur in the knee, Achilles, foot or back or the shoulder from swimming. They can occur due to a breakdown in tissue that doesn’t have adequate time to repair itself before more use.

    If you are seeing aches and pains that don’t subside in approximately three days in the well-trained athlete or seven days in a new participant (due to new muscles being trained,) it is time to take some time off and seek out your local physical therapist for guidance. A physical therapy plan of care can help you heal, regain/increase strength and flexibility and reduce pain. It can also help you prevent future injury and optimize your sports performance.

    Author: Melissa Bryant, P.T. Melissa serves as the center manager for Select Physical Therapy’s Colorado Springs facility, located in the USA Triathlon headquarters building.

    Select Physical Therapy and Physio are part of the Select Medical Outpatient Division family of brands.

    Resources

    • Vleck, V., & Alves, F. B. (2011). TRiathlon injury review. British journal of sports medicine, 45(4), 382-383.
    • Koutedakis, Y., Budgett, R., & Faulmann, L. (1990). Rest in underperforming elite competitors. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 24(4), 248-252.
    • Gosling, C. M., Forbes, A. B., McGivern, J., & Gabbe, B. J. (2010). A profile of injuries in athletes seeking treatment during a triathlon race series. The American journal of sports medicine, 38(5), 1007-1014.
    • Budgett, R. (1990). Overtraining syndrome. British journal of sports medicine, 24(4), 231-236.
    • O'Toole, M. L., Hiller, W. D. B., Smith, R. A., & Sisk, T. D. (1989). Overuse injuries in ultraendurance triathietes. The American journal of sports medicine, 17(4), 514-518.
    • Collins, K., Wagner, M., Peterson, K., & Storey, M. (1989). Overuse injuries in triathletes: a study of the 1986 Seafair Triathlon. The American journal of sports medicine, 17(5), 675-680. 

     


  • Close up of female hand while playing the piano

    Posted on 6/9/2021

    The first week of June has been annually designated by the American Society of Hand Therapists as Hand Therapy Week. It’s a time for raising awareness of hand, wrist, arm, elbow and shoulder injuries and conditions and the therapists who have specialized training to treat them. This week is also a great time to spotlight the individuals who most benefit from hand therapy, individuals like musicians.

    Playing a musical instrument is emotionally, mentally and physically demanding. Musicians, like athletes, are at risk for career-ending injuries in the neck, shoulder, wrist and hand. In a musicians’ lifetime, 63-93% will experience musculoskeletal symptoms related to their instrument play. Even the most conscientious musician can begin with symptoms or injury at various times through their play and performance season.

    The challenges musicians face are practice and rehearsal patterns established by others (an orchestra conductor, for example) in large segments of time, without rest or stretch breaks. There is also fierce competition for work, and musicians may be reluctant to complain of injury or new symptoms for fear of losing out on an opportunity. Additional injury risk factors include inadequate physical conditioning, poor posture, abrupt increase in play time and patterns, poor techniques or a change in the instrument.

    Symptoms, whether intermittent or persistent, are seen most often when learning to play over the age of 50. In professional musicians, symptoms can present when increasing the complexity or time spent playing.

    Common symptoms include:

    • Pain
    • Muscle cramping
    • Tremors/spasms
    • Inability to control motion
    • Headaches
    • Numbness/tingling
    • Stuck, catching or locking joints
    • Inability to straighten fingers

    Hand therapists have the important skills needed to evaluate musicians and identify abnormal sensation, poor posture and other causes of symptoms.

    A therapist identifies risk factors and develops a rehabilitation program specific to the musician’s instrument, goals and play demand. The plan may start with an active rest period, avoiding activities that cause symptoms while mentally rehearsing and initiating new normal movement patterns. During this stage, the therapist modifies the play/practice schedule and explores pain control techniques and strategies including diet, exercise, sleep and posture.

    When the active symptoms quiet down, the hand therapist begins the advanced rehabilitation phase with a goal to return to play. The therapist monitors play and rest cycle and a home program is developed to provide visual feedback using imagery and mirrors. The advanced rehabilitation phase also involves aerobics and fitness, strengthening, postural exercises and increased duration and complexity of play.

    The hand therapist works with the musician to develop a return to normal play schedule that is timed incrementally. The schedule starts with a slow and easy repertoire and passages, increasing to fast and more challenging passages for up to 10 minutes. Activities that help with return to play include warm-up with brisk walking, cycling and stretching.

    The musician will warm-up with their instrument using easy scales, long movements, slow and quiet play. As rehabilitation progresses, 50 minutes is generally the maximum play time before rest is suggested. The therapist also instructs the musician on symptom management techniques during rest and after play. These management techniques include ice, hydration and stretching.

    Hand therapists identify the root cause of injury, provide a whole-body approach to care and work in collaboration with music instructors to ensure continuity with proper technique and posture. Education and early intervention is key, as early treatment leads to better outcomes.

    If you or a loved one are a musician and suffering from pain or discomfort while playing, request an appointment today and experience the power of hand therapy. Our certified hand therapists will help you get back to doing what you love – creating beautiful music!

    By: Rob McClellan, OTR/L, CHT. Rob serves as the hand program coordinator for Physio.

    Physio is part of the Select Medical Outpatient Division family of brands. 

     

     


  • woman wearing covid protection mask

    Posted on 5/25/2021

    Have you heard the term “mask jaw”? Well, guess what? It’s a thing!

    Mask jaw is the jaw pain and pressure many of us experience as we wear our masks for an extended period of time since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, while the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently put out new masking guidance for vaccinated people, masks will still be part of most of our lives for the foreseeable future. And, all that mask wearing can take a toll!

    If you jut your chin forward or tense your jaw muscles to hold your mask in its proper position over your nose and mouth, you are likely experiencing jaw tightness. Headaches and muscle tension can also be caused by stress, something we’ve all felt more of since March 2020!

    Let’s take a closer look at how your jaw works. Your jaw bone connects to your skull on both sides of your face, and is referred to as the temporomandibular joint, or TMJ. It is a rounded bone, with a disc that provides a cushion to support the joint, much like the discs in your spine and meniscus in your knee.

    When you first open your mouth, your jaw hinges and rotates. As you open further, it glides and translates until you open it fully. This action happens with large muscles from your temples and cheek, to smaller muscles deep within the jaw. At least that’s how it works normally. When there is an issue with the disc, the muscles or the joint itself, it is referred to as temporomandibular joint dysfunction, or TMD.

    TMD includes a wide range of symptoms, such as pain in the jaw or neck, headaches, locking of the jaw in an open or closed position, clicking noises and pain or difficulty with speaking, eating or chewing. TMD symptoms are widely reported by many people, but become troublesome when they start limiting your day-to-day activities.

    Now, let’s dive into how your mask may be the culprit to any lingering jaw pain you may be experiencing.

    1. Maybe you are breathing through your mouth while wearing your mask. Did you know that this places more stress on the jaw from it being constantly open?

      Wearing a mask can feel like you are not getting enough fresh air, but it should not alter how you breathe. Each inhale and exhale should pass in and out of your nose. Your jaw muscles are relaxed in this “resting” position. This means that the tip of your tongue is gently touching the roof of your mouth while your back teeth, the molars, are not quite touching.  

      If you breathe in and out of your mouth, your jaw remains open. To keep your jaw open means your muscles are doing extra work. When you breathe with a mask on, focus on the air passing in and out of your nose.
    2. Maybe the ear loops are too tight. This creates tension and can throw off the alignment of your jaw and, in some cases, cause headache. 

      Masks come in all shapes and sizes, and the fit is important. Whether made of fabric or disposable, it should never feel like it is pulling your ears forward or your chin backward. These compressive forces can easily trigger a headache. Consider a mask extender or “ear savers” to keep the ear loops from tugging and avoid a potential headache altogether.
    3. Are you clenching your teeth more because of stress? This is an easy trigger for TMJ pain and dysfunction. 

      Remember the resting jaw position? This is the most relaxed position for the muscles. When you clench your teeth and hold that bite position for extended periods of time, the jaw muscles can go into spasm. Avoid gum chewing or biting your nails, which can make symptoms worse. Exercise is a key component to overall health and managing stress. Take a walk or jog, meditate or find another way to get moving. Your body and your jaw will thank you.
    4. Chances are, you are moving your jaw in altered positions to adjust how your mask is resting on your face. 

      With a proper fitting mask, you will avoid overusing your jaw. Use a mask that has some moldable wire that can be shaped around your nose. Additionally, avoid masks that are too big and sag on your face, or that are too small and tug on your ears. You should be able to speak and breath through your mouth (wink, wink) comfortably. To avoid jaw pain, make sure your mask is molded to your face and does not slide or move easily.  

      If you are feeling pain or clenching in your jaw, experiencing headaches or are having difficulty with chewing or eating, physical therapy can help. To learn more about our TMD program or to schedule an appointment at one of our centers, please contact us today.

      By: Nicole Romaine, P.T., MPT. Nicole is a physical therapist for Kessler Rehabilitation Center in West Orange, NJ. 

      Kessler and Physio are part of the Select Medical Outpatient Division family of brands.
     

     


  • Posted on 5/12/2021

    “Am I Injured?”

    This is a question I get asked by many runners.

    “How do I know if I’m injured and not just sore from running/training?”

    Short of a physical examination, this is what I tell them...

    There is good pain and bad pain. Good pain stops when you stop. It is generally mild, diffuses and doesn’t affect quality of movement. Bad pain does not stop when you stop. It can get worse during or after activity. It can be sharp in nature, and significant enough to force you to change your gait whether you realize it or not.

    If you have rested or taken time off from running, and the pain has decreased or gone away only to return when you start running again, there is most likely some underlying issue that needs to be addressed. There could be an issue with muscle imbalances, running form, footwear, training schedule, joint mechanics or any combination of these.

    If you are taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) daily or after every run for pain, you may have an overuse injury. Overuse injuries account for the majority of running injuries. They occur when a tissue is loaded beyond its threshold. In bone, this can result in a stress fracture. In tendon, this usually manifests as tendonitis or tendinosis. Excessive stress to a ligament can result in a sprain.

    Overuse is relative and not always obvious. It can be a result of “too much, too soon” with regard to training or mileage. It can also be due to cumulative stress from non-running activities and/or compensation. When a structure takes on additional stress to unload another, it can break down.

    How can physical therapy help? A thorough evaluation by a physical therapist can help identify the underlying problem so that you’re not just treating symptoms.

    A progressive loading program can assist the injured tissue regain the strength needed to resume running and training. Hands-on therapy can also help restore normal joint mechanics so that muscles are functioning more efficiently and inert structures are not unnecessarily stressed.

    Physical therapy can you build strength, endurance and minimize running injuries, so you can achieve your personal best.

    By: Martine Marino, MPT, COMT. Martine is a physical therapist and the center manager for NovaCare Rehabilitation in Bethel Park, PA.

    NovaCare and Physio are part of the Select Medical Outpatient Division family of brands. 

     

     


  • Posted on 3/19/2021

    What is an athletic trainer? Often confused with personal trainers, athletic trainers are allied health care professionals recognized by the American Medical Association trained to handle the prevention, examination, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of emergent, acute or chronic injuries and medical conditions. That’s important work! Athletic trainers work primarily in the field of sports medicine and are trained to handle injuries and conditions affecting the neuromuscular (nerve and muscle relationship) and musculoskeletal (bone and muscle relationship) systems.

    Now that we have a better understanding of what an athletic trainer is, you might be wondering what an athletic trainer does day-to-day. At Physio, we employ many athletic trainers to provide services to local middle schools, high schools, colleges and professional teams as well as club and league tournaments. Within these settings, our athletic trainers provide services ranging from:

    • Taping
    • Education on injury reduction and management
    • Emergency care and triage
    • Stretching, and other hands-on therapeutic techniques
    • Develop exercise/rehabilitation programs
    • Mental health and nutrition needs and refer appropriately when necessary
    • Create and implement emergency action plans and return to play protocols

    The goal of an athletic trainer is to prevent the athlete from getting injured in the first place. In the event that an injury occurs, they examine and treat the athlete/individual and if the injured party requires further diagnostic testing or follow-up of any sort, they refer to the proper specialist and work in tandem with them to ensure proper care.

    When the time comes to rehabilitate an athlete’s injury, our athletic trainers create a treatment plan and collaborate with one of the many wonderful physical therapists that work for our organization. They are also integral in being one of the first on scene when an athlete suffers a concussion. Athletic trainers provide both sideline and full concussion evaluations. They are able to conduct baseline tests which primarily measure the neurocognitive and/or vestibular-ocular (eyes and balance) motor system and help direct care to the proper specialist, communicate with parents, the school nurse and advisors/teachers when needed. As the athlete continues post-concussion treatment, athletic trainers help them progress through the return-to-play protocol to ensure a safe return to sport.

    Developing and implementing emergency action plans and other important procedures regarding return to play is an important part of an athletic trainer’s role. These procedures and policies include acclimatization, inclement weather including heat management, COVID-19 and others to help keep athletes safe. In addition, they maintain inventory and assist with budgets and provide ongoing communication to coaches, school administration and parents.

    It’s also important to note that while the focus here is the athletic trainer’s role with athletes, they also provide the same clinical expertise to many companies working with the “industrial athlete.”

    By: Josh Cramer, LAT, Germantown Academy, Philadelphia, PA



  • pediatric e-learning ergonomics

    Posted on 2/17/2021

    Is your child’s e-learning set-up ergonomically correct? Poor ergonomics can lead to poor posture, resulting in neck pain, low back pain, tightness of muscles and weakening of other muscles. It can also cause headaches, tendonitis in the hands/wrists and carpal tunnel syndrome.

    With COVID-19 presenting new ways in which schools are conducting class, it is important to maintain proper sitting posture to prevent muscle straining and improve attention. Age does not discriminate against poor ergonomics, especially if long periods of time are spent sitting in front of a computer. Our physical and occupational therapists offer five simple tips that can help you ensure that your child is maintaining the proper sitting posture during e-learning.

    Tip 1: Ensure that your child’s feet are planted firmly on the ground. If their feet do not reach the ground, use a text book, plastic container or cardboard box for them to rest their feet on.

    Tip 2: Adjust the height of the chair to ensure that there is a 90 degree bend at the knees and hips while sitting. Changing the depth of the seat can alter the angle at the hips. Consider using a pillow or rolled towel to keep the hips bent.

    Tip 3: Elbows should rest gently at the side with forearms reaching just forward to the computer, allowing your child’s back to remain against the backing of the chair. If the elbows and shoulders are elevated, try lowering the height of the desk or increasing the height of the chair.

    Tip 4: Elevate the screen of the computer so that your child is looking straight forward. Place your device on textbooks, laundry baskets or couch cushions. When it comes time to type, lower the device back to the desk or table. Remember, there should be a 90 degree bend in the elbows to allow the arms to rest close to thigh height while typing.

    Tip 5: Kids are wired to play and move! Have your child get up and move around when given breaks during class. Encouraging these movement breaks will improve your child’s attention, regulation and body awareness to help maintain good posture during learning.

    If you have questions or concerns about your child’s posture or development, please contact our Kids pediatric therapy centers today to request an appointment.

    By: Courtney Engel, M.S., OTR/L, and Meredith Krifka, P.T., DPT, c/NDT. Courtney is an occupational therapist and Meredith is a physical therapist with RUSH Kids Pediatric Therapy in Fullerton, Illinois.

    RUSH and Physio are part of the Select Medical Outpatient Division family of brands. 


  • concussion - soccer players

    Posted on 1/22/2021

    While sports might continue to look a little differently this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the safety for our athletes remains a top priority. Our athletic trainers and physical therapists provide crucial education for the protection of our athletes while they are participating in their long-awaited sports seasons, as well as provide comprehensive therapy to aid in the recovery of any injuries sustained.

    One of the most prominent, but often less understood, sports injuries is the concussion. There are many myths and misconceptions about concussions, but they can occur from any impact to the head, neck or body. A concussion starts with a physical impact and can be a direct hit to the head or an indirect hit, such as the rebound of the head/neck in a football tackle. The obvious hits are the easiest to recognize; however, the less obvious hits are harder to catch and may lead to missed symptoms.

    While not all hits lead to a concussion, it is important that we are on the lookout concussion symptoms. Parents, coaches and teammates should be educated on common symptoms in order to prevent the athlete from playing through injury. Symptoms can include:

    • Headache
    • Dizziness
    • Fatigue
    • Feeling foggy
    • Difficulty thinking
    • Imbalance
    • Sensitivity to light or sound
    • Blurred or double vision

    The presentation of these symptoms may start showing immediately or be delayed up to 24 hours.

    It is also important that a thorough assessment be performed to rule out that an injury has not occurred before returning to play. Playing through a possible concussion or missing concussion symptoms overall is a safety concern and could delay return to sport. Always think, “When in doubt, sit them out.” This assures the athlete rests initially for 24-48 hours to allow the body and brain to rest and heal.

    During this resting period, to the athlete should avoid mental and visual strain as well as excessive activity. This includes anything that increases your symptoms, such as watching television, playing video games and being on the computer and/or phone.

    Most concussions will resolve themselves within 7-10 days, but approximately 15-20% of patients present with lasting symptoms – most notably headaches – which may be the result of delayed healing. Initially, resting the brain helps decrease prolonged symptoms and extended healing times. After the initial resting phase, best practice is to begin an active recovery. Physical therapy intervention can set athletes up with an appropriate exertion program that is safe for the brain.

    Our centers offer a variety of opportunities to work with therapists specializing in concussion rehabilitation who help to establish the underlying cause of prolonged symptoms. Each comprehensive examination focuses on the most common factors that may lead to delayed healing, including physiologic recovery (Is your brain healed enough to tolerate activity) and visual and vestibular involvement (Are your eyes or inner ears playing a role in your symptoms? Is the neck involved?).

    Our evaluation and treatments are backed by evidence that will help patients recover more quickly in order to safely return to symptom-free participation in their respective sports.

    By: Megan Brainerd, P.T., DPT, COMT. Megan is a physical therapist with Select Physical Therapy in Summerville, SC.

    Select Physical Therapy and Physio are part of the Select Medical Outpatient Division family of brands. 


  • Asian Dad pushes Daughter on Swings

    Posted on 1/20/2021

    Does your child suffer from bowel and bladder issues? If so, did you know that pediatric physical therapists can help to treat conditions including constipation, urinary incontinence, daytime and nighttime wetting, holding bowel movements and refusing to have a bowel movement?

    As a pediatric physical therapist, I believe in a family approach to care and assess muscle strength and muscle imbalances in the body, specifically the pelvic floor. I address body awareness and coordination of muscles so that children can urinate and have a full bowel movement effectively and efficiently. To do this, I use exercise, proper breathing techniques for fun and relaxation, books, videos, play and biofeedback (a way that kids can get “in tune” to their pelvic floor by watching their muscles in a mirror or using a machine) to help children understand their body and take control.

    Let’s talk a little bit about where this journey typically starts for a family – potty training. There is so much information on potty training methods, yet there is a relatively small amount of quality research to support or disprove most of the methods. The most successful method will be the one that both you and your child agree on. It is important that you both feel motivated and confident throughout the process.

    No matter what method you choose:

    • Be consistent.
    • Never scold or humiliate.
    • Never prohibit from toileting.
    • Make sure you know where toilets are when you are outside of the home.
    • Reward attempts and successes.
    • Incentives do not need to be store bought; spending time together is special enough.
    • Make it fun!

    Awareness of bladder sensation and control begins in the first and second year of life. Voluntary voiding control begins at two to three years of age. An adult pattern of urinary control should be developed by four or five years of age. It’s not about starting at a certain age, it’s about starting when your child is ready.

    According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (2006), your child should show the following signs when they are ready to potty train:

    • Is dry at least two hours at a time during the day or is dry after naps
    • Bowel movements become regular and predictable
    • Facial expressions, posture or words reveal that your child is about to urinate or have a bowel movement
    • Can follow simple instructions
    • Can walk to and from the bathroom and help undress
    • Seems uncomfortable with soiled diapers and wants to be changed
    • Asks to use the toilet or potty chair
    • Asks to wear “grown-up” underwear
    • Can sit on a potty, maintaining the physical position and attention, for a short time
    • Is able to communicate bodily sensations such as hunger or thirst
    • Demonstrates interest in watching and imitating others’ bathroom-related actions
    • Communicates the need to go before it happens

    Typically, we see children urinate six-to-eight times per day and have five-to-seven bowel movements per week.

    I, too, have been on the potty training adventure with my son Devin. It is not always an easy road, and having a professional to talk with is helpful. Devin was potty trained before I was trained in dysfunctional voiding, but it would have been useful to know about massaging the belly to promote a bowel movement, deep breathing for relaxation of the pelvic floor muscles, and the plethora of kids’ books about potty training.

    If you have questions or concerns, please contact your local pediatric therapy center to schedule a complimentary 15-minute consultation to assess the needs of your family’s potty training adventure.

    By: Dawn Meller, MPT. Dawn is a pediatric physical therapist and pelvic floor specialist with RUSH Kids Pediatric Therapy in North Aurora, Illinois.

    RUSH Kids and Physio are part of the Select Medical family of brands. 


  • top five injuries in basketball

    Posted on 1/6/2021

    Basketball is arguably one of the most popular sports in America, especially among children and young adults. From March Madness to the NBA finals, people love watching and playing basketball. The love for the game does not take away the risk that it carries for injury, though. Whether played recreationally or in an organized league, there are injuries that arise, and some are more common than others.

    Outside of head injuries, the most common basketball injuries typically involve the lower body. Some of the most common ones include:

    1. Ankle sprains – Nearly half of all basketball-related injuries involve the ankle and foot. From “rolling” an ankle, to landing awkwardly, to getting stepped on, playing basketball leaves athletes open to injury. Treatment for ankle injuries, specifically ankle sprains, involve ICE - ice, compression, elevation - and physical therapy, dependent on the seriousness. 

      Most injuries can be treated without a trip to the doctor’s office; however, if there is pain directly on top of the outside bone and you are unable to walk a couple steps, a trip to urgent care could be necessary. Typically, with the right exercise plan, an athlete can be back to their sport in two-to-six weeks.
    2. Thigh bruises – Getting a knee to the thigh can be one of the worst pains for a basketball player. Because of this, more and more athletes are beginning to wear compression garments with thigh padding. If hit hard enough in the thigh by an opposing player, the muscle can tighten up and bruise. 

      Typically, these injuries can be played through; however, some deep tissue massage by a licensed professional is often needed to help loosen up the muscle. Outside of massage, ICE is recommended.
    3. Knee injuries: ACL/Meniscus/Patella tendon – Knee injuries are very common in basketball. The three most common knee injuries include the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), Meniscus and patella tendon. If you watch or play basketball, you have likely heard of these injuries. 

      An ACL tear is probably the most talked about. The ACL is one of the bands of ligaments that connect the thigh bone to the shin bone at the knee. If an ACL is torn, it generally requires surgery and months of physical therapy to return to play. 

      The meniscus is the little brother of the ACL. Every knee has two, and oftentimes they are injured along with the ACL. The meniscus is the cushioning of the knee joint. Without them, the thigh bone would sit directly on top of the lower leg bones, which would get uncomfortable quickly. Treatment for meniscus injuries can vary from ICE, to surgery and physical therapy, to just physical therapy. 

      Lastly, patella tendonitis, typically known as jumper’s knee, is the most common knee injury. It is a result of inflammation of the patella tendon which connects your kneecap to your shin bone.  Jumper’s knee can usually be healed with a personalized exercise plan from a physical therapist.
    4. Jammed fingers – Jammed fingers are exceptionally common in basketball. They normally occur when the tip of the finger hits the ball “head on” without bending. This motion can lead to swelling in the finger and immediate pain. 

      Although uncomfortable, this injury isn’t usually serious. Jammed fingers typically heal without medical interventions or trips to the emergency room. Buddy taping (taping the finger to the finger next to it) and ice can you heal in as little as a week. However, if pain or swelling persists, a trip to your doctor or a consultant with a physical therapist may be necessary.
    5. Concussion – Concussions make up about 15% of all sport-related injuries, not just basketball. Most of these injuries are typically managed either by an athletic trainer alone, an athletic train and physical therapy or by an athletic trainer in combination with a doctor or other health care professional. A concussion is brain injury that occurs after an impact to the head, neck or body. In basketball, a few examples of when concussions occur is when an athlete hits their head on the hard gym floor or when there is a head-to-head, head-to-elbow, head-to-shoulder, etc., collision. After a concussion is diagnosed, the athlete is unable to return to play for a minimum of five days. Some concussion recoveries can go slowly, with symptoms lingering. When this occurs, concussion and vestibular rehabilitation by a licensed physical therapist is a great option.

    Nearly all of these injuries can be resolved with the help of a licensed physical therapist. If you suspect that you have one of these injuries, please contact a center near you to request an appointment today. With a guided treatment and exercise plan provided by a licensed physical therapist, you can be back on the court in no time.

    References:

    By: Wyneisha Mason, MAT, ATC. ‘Neisha is an athletic trainer with RUSH Physical Therapy in Chicago, Illinois.

    RUSH and Physio are part of the Select Medical Outpatient Division family of brands.